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Cleveland Vulkon
June 1998
Cleveland (Independence), Ohio, US

This transcript prepared by Niomi and Fever.

DISCLAIMERS:  This transcript is not 100% accurate but the transcribers have attempted to be as accurate as possible.  Should you wish to use this transcript, or portions of it elsewhere, please contact Niomi and Fever for permission.

Note:  "Q" indicates comments from the audience

(Applause!)

RDM:
Looks like we've got the whole club over here.  (gestures at RanDoM Flighters)  Wow!  Good to see you guys.  Terrific.  All right!  RanDoM Flight!  Go, Go, Go . . .

Q:
You didn't wear the black suit this time!

RDM:
No, no black suit.  I do remember that.  The fan club told me--It's been a while since I've done a convention and--does anybody know?

Q:
November

RDM:
November.  So, I'm a little nervous.  It's been a while.  All these people.  In November I did a convention and the fan club came up to me and they gave me this-this gift, and they said this was because every time we see you at a convention you're wearing the black pants, the black coat and the white shirt.  And we need some color pictures for the newsletter.  (laughter)  They gave me a Hawaiian shirt.  (laughter)  It's very colorful.

(Fever Observation:  Robbie doesn't quite have the story of the Hawaiian shirt incident right but he's a busy guy, so I forgive him. ;) )

RDM:
How are you guys?

Q:
Great . . . !

RDM:
All right!  Having fun?

Q:
Yeah!

RDM:
Good.  I heard there was a rainstorm or something.  I was sleeping.  (laughter)  Because I was flying all night and didn't sleep at all last night, so I slept right through it.  It was a big rainstorm.  Wow.  Wish I hadn't missed it.  Did you have any tornadoes or anything?

(various responses from audience)

RDM:
Did you really?  Our director of photography, Marvin Rush, is a very eccentric man.  Have any of you ever heard him speak or seen Marvin or anything?  Going off the subject a little bit.  Marvin is on this kick this week.  Marvin drives an electric car and is really into the environment and is a real activist with electric cars and things like that.  Marvin is on a kick this week and we can't get him to stop talking about . . . and the world is gonna end.  It's like this week.  And the tornadoes are the sign . . . The environment is going nuts.  So, you know, he's trying to get everybody to drive electric cars . . . And the end of the world . . . as I sort of  digress there for a minute.  Well, whenever I hear about a tornado now, I think, well, maybe he's right.  (Con staff hand RDM iced tea)  Ahh.  Thank you.  A little caffeine, thank you.  Yeah, we worked about 18 hours on Thursday, so I'm still a little out of it from that long, long day.  And of course flying last night.  What can I tell you guys about the season?  Let's see.

Q:
Everything!

RDM:
I'll tell you about all the shows.  All the ones, both of them, that we've started shooting that are coming up.

Q:
Any Tom and B'Elanna?

RDM:
Actually, I don't know about the second one because they started yesterday without me, so I can only tell you about one of them.  Let's see.  Hold on.  (Con staff fiddles with wires on stage)  Ok.  Thanks a lot.  What can I tell you?  We had a big day  on Thursday.  We shot 18 hours and it was really a cool day because they have this new idea--Brannon came up with it, I guess.  I'm not sure who came up with it, but it's a really good idea, I think.  You know how every year we have the holodeck and they try to come up with some holodeck that is going to be like continuous throughout the year, and, you know, they have Sandrine's Bar and Da Vinci's Workshop, and all these holodeck things that didn't quite catch, you know?  Well, they've come up with one this year that I think is a great idea.  And what it is, it's kind of my holodeck program, and what it is, it's like a retro sci-fi kind of holodeck movie.  Like a Flash Gordon or something, right?  I play Captain Proton.  (loud laughter)  And I wear this--it kind of looks like the Rocketeer--it's all art deco and very--I probably shouldn't be telling you everything, but it's a really cool idea.  Like the very first shot of this holodeck when they introduce it they cut to like a space shot of Earth, you know.  But it's one of those cheesy earths, kind of like a model, like a globe, kind of thing, turning.  And the whole thing is done in black and white.  We have this kind of evil sorcerer guy, Dr. Chaotica.  (laughter)  And it's just very funny.  I think it's gonna be great.  And the whole thing is in black and white, you know.  It's going to be cool.  I think it's going to be great.  It's like why didn't we think of this before?  It's the perfect holodeck for this kind of show.  Sort of  sci-fi making fun of sci-fi.  It'll be fun.  And hopefully after we get past the funny silly stuff we'll be able to really integrate it, because it's the perfect kind of holodeck for our show.  We can use it for funny stuff, for serious stuff, for all kinds of things.  So, that's why we worked 18 hours.  That was the first day on that that Dr. Chaotica/Captain Proton set.  And Marvin was talking about the end of the world.  Anyway, what else can I tell you?  Everybody's back.  No worries.  I heard the rumors.  (clapping)  People would call and say, "Are they all coming back?  We heard this and we heard that."  Everybody's back.  That's the big news.  We just started, I don't know what to tell you.  What else can I tell you before I do questions?

Q:
How was everybody's summer?

RDM:
What?

Q:
How was everybody's summer?

RDM:
Everybody's summer?

Q:
Hiatus.

RDM:
Hiatus, yeah.  It is kind of summer, isn't it?  It's strange, you know, because I have kids and I actually had my third child . . . Yeah, I had a little baby January 21st.

Q:
(unintelligible)

RDM:
My third, yes.  Carter Jay.  Well, I didn't actually have it.  (laughter)  But my wife's not here so I can take all the credit.  But, Carter Jay, and he's doing great.  He's the biggest baby in the world.  He's like 18 pounds, got four teeth, four months old.  Unbelievable.  And what else?  Roxann had a beautiful baby girl.  Emma.  Yay, Roxann!  She actually had that one.  (laughter)  And the baby doesn't have bumps on her head.  Looks pretty human.  And it's not my child.  Despite those rumors, it's not mine.  What else can I tell you?  I don't know.  I visited the movie set Thursday on our long, long, long day.  During our lunch break I went over and saw Jonathan Frakes and LeVar and actually that was the only people that were working that day.  They seemed to be having a great time.  Everybody when I was at the movie that day said they felt that this was the best movie they'd ever done.  So that's kind of exciting.  Because the last one was so good, I thought.  I thought it was great.  Anyway, they've got the big movie set and we're over on the Dr. Chaotica set.  (laughter)  It's all right.  What else can I tell you?  All right, I'll do questions.

Q:
Garrett Wang has mentioned in an online interview something about the running man contest you two have.  What's that about?

RDM:
He's so weird.  He thinks the strangest things are so funny.  Well, he calls me the running man sometimes because, you know my seat down front, normally you can't see my feet.  You can't see my legs because I'm behind that little console, and I have this chair that slides back and forth and so sometimes when I have to make one of these moves and stuff, I'll do like funny feet.  You know, can I do it here?  All right.  It's really not that funny.  (RDM moves to chair at back of stage and sits in it to demonstrate his "running man")  But anything to crack people up.  So I'll be doing some big scene where Garrett's in the background and he's not supposed to be laughing, so that's why I do this, of course.  And I'll push off the one side and I'll just kind of go WHOOSH! (RDM strikes "running man" pose on chair with legs apart in classic running pose while seated) and slide over to this side, and he calls me the running man.  I don't know.  It's not that funny!  But when you work these long hours anything is funny.  It's a contest to try to keep a straight face.  We actually--all right, I'll tell you something that happened this week that was funny.  You know Garrett does impersonations of everybody in the show.  I do horrible impersonations, but we've come up with the Harry Kim impersonation.  It goes--I'm horrible at impersonations--but I will do it.  Something like this, you know this is kind of the standard Harry Kim on the Bridge.  (RDM uses the Garrett Wang inflection to the max)  "Captaaaaaaiiiiinnnnn, I'm reading sommmmmmethinnnnnggggg.  Captaaaaaaaiiiiinnnnn, they're approachinnnnnggggg.  We don't have much lonnnnnggggger, Captaaaaaaiiiiinnnnn."  (laughter)  He just kind of does everything with that kind of inflection, right?  So we were really teasing Garrett in this one scene, and I had a close-up of this whole Bridge thing.  You know, this really big Bridge scene.  And so Kate Mulgrew dared me to do my lines like Garrett does his.  (laughter)  So, of course, she says I'll give you 50 bucks if you do you lines like Garrett does.  All right, 50 bucks, you're on.  I did the whole thing.  But not only did I do my lines, but they started off camera doing their lines like that.  So everybody in the scene, including Kate Mulgrew and Robert Beltran and Tim Russ are all going (with GW inflection), "That's right, Captaaaaaaiiiiinnnnn."  (laughter)  And so everybody, well, it was a long scene, and I actually made it through the whole scene without laughing.  Everybody else, off camera, is like cracking up.  You know, it doesn't matter what they do, because they're not on camera.  But I actually made it through the whole scene doing it that way, going, you know, "Thirty seconds, Captaaaaaaiiiiinnnnn."  Ah well, that's what we do.  That's why we get paid the big bucks.  (laughter)  It's a really intelligent thing.

Q:
Did you get the 50 bucks?

RDM:
You know what, I didn't get the 50 bucks.  (laughter)   I didn't.  And I think I need your help in collecting.  You can email, whatever you want to do.  Kate Mulgrew owes me 50 bucks.  What else?  I'm talking over here because my club's over here.  (group he points to cheers)  There's some over here (other side of room).  Okay.  Yes, sir?

Q:
Garrett had also mentioned at one point that you had your own version of Mr. Sandman.

RDM:
I had my own version of Mr. Sandman?

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Mr. Tuvok.  He has a version of Mr. Tuvok.

Q:
He told me to ask for yours if I saw you.

RDM:
He's blaming everything on me.  Unbelievable.  No, I don't have a version of Mr. Tuvok.  No.  I don't.  I can make one up if you like.  No.

Q:
Improvise.

RDM:
Yeah, improvise, right, sure.  I haven't been to a convention in six months, but I'll improvise.  No, I don't have a Mr. Sandman song.  Beltran does.  Beltran makes up a lot of--We have a lot of good impersonators on our show.  Beltran does incredible impersonations.  Have you heard it?  I mean like, not just of us, but of lots of people.  Very good, yeah, very funny.  Yes ma'am?

Q:
How about your Riverdance impression?

RDM:
Ah, the Riverdance impression.  We do that.  Lord of the Dance.  (loud stage stomp as RDM assumes a Michael-Flatley-like pose)  I'm trying to remember things.  You know, we've been on hiatus for so long it's just all starting to come back to me.  Yeah, we used to do Michael Flatley's Lord of the Dance.  We do that.  Yeah, that's fun.  We're really--we're campaigning for, you know, Voyager the Musical.  (laughter)  We have a lot of talent . . . could do the dancing, the singing, the whole thing.  I think it would work.  It would be good.  So, we're working on that one.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
What's that?

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Chicago Hope, wasn't it?  Chicago Hope did one.  Yeah, yeah, I think we're due.  Sci-fi.  We'll do it on the Dr. Chaotica set . . . Who else?

Q:
Will you be directing this year?

RDM:
Yes, I am going to be directing this year.  (clapping)  Yeah.  Well, you guys know, it's like any actor that gets on Star Trek, everybody wants to direct.  So, it's, ah--Last year was disappointing to me because I thought I would keep directing.  I thought the other two shows I did I thought turned out really good.  Yeah, they were good.  Well, you guys probably know, but, what were they called?

Q:
"Unity" and "Sacred Ground."

RDM:
"Unity" and "Sacred Ground", right.  "Sacred Ground", right.  I loved "Sacred Ground", actually.  That was one of my favorite shows.  I thought Kate did a wonderful job, you know.  The guest stars were very funny.  It was a real good picture to do.  And "Unity" was fun--I don't know.  I love directing.  I really do.  I mean, I'm supposed to be directing a series for Nickelodeon called Alan Strange.  The Journey of Alan Strange.  Do you know this show?  I'm supposed to be directing that probably in August.  You can help me out on that, too.  Email Nickelodeon.  No, I hooked up with these people because this other show--I'll digress again for a minute.  They had a show on--this producer had a show called The Secret World of Alex Mack.  You know that show?  And my daughter, who is eight years old now, loves Alex Mack, of course, and so I started watching it.  And thought it was just so well done.  You know, it was like a great sci-fi kind of fantasy show for kids.  I thought it was a perfect kind of perfectly geared towards that age level and really well written and well done.  Anyway, so, I contacted these people and I said, you know, I'm directing on my show and I watch your show every week, so I might as  well work on it.  My daughter watches it all the time.  So, anyway, I met these people and they were just starting this new show now Alan Strange, and again  I thought it was a great idea, you know.  It's about this kid, this alien, that comes to Earth, and he gets left behind and so he takes on a human form, but he can still morph back into his alien form.  It's really--it's a fun show.  And they have great lessons and anyway, so I'm going to direct that in August and then our show probably later in the year.  Yeah.  Yeah, I love directing and I think a lot of times on our show, I'll be honest, I'll be a little critical, sometimes the directors don't really dig deep enough into the acting and into the stories.  You know, we have great effects and we have great shots and great sets, but sometimes they forget to deal with the other: the story part, the character part.  So that's one thing I feel I, when I direct, I really--I know the actors like that--they can really dig a little deeper with the characters and try to let them be real special shows, you know.

Q:
Do they respond better to you because you're an actor?

RDM:
I think they do, just because we know each other so well.  You know, they feel comfortable talking to me.  We know each other's language and so we can sort of have shortcuts for things.  But, yeah, I definitely think the actors kind of come up a notch when another actor's directing.  You're aware that this is an actor who's thinking about the same thing.  It definitely comes up a notch.  What else?  Yes ma'am.

Q:
Last night while waiting for Kim to get in from one of these flights from you know where--

RDM:
Yeah.

Q:
--we were watching "Day of Honor" and the subject of body piercing came up.  (laughter)  In one shot, it looks like you have had a pierced ear at one point in time.

RDM:
I have.

Q:
Do you have any extra . . .

RDM:
Extra body piercing?  (laughter)  Is this something we should talk about?

(laughter)

Q:
No, we can give you our room number . . .

(laughter)

RDM:
She asked--can you guys hear way back there?

Q:
No.

RDM:
No.  She said in one of the shows it looked like I had a pierced ear at one point, and is that true, and how many other places am I pierced.  (laughter)  Um, I did have a  pierced ear.  You know, in the 80's, it was like, I don't know.  I guess it's in now, but I don't have an earring or wear an earring.  But, you know, back when I was young and everything, I actually--I don't know if any of you remember when I was on All My Children?  (cheer from somewhere in the audience that generates laughter)  I did this soap opera for three years and the last year I was nominated for a Daytime Emmy.  And I went to the Emmys and I wore like this really long dangly earring, like a cross or something, you know.  I also ride motorcycles, so it's kind of a, well, back then I think it was I'll pierce my ear, and I'll ride motorcycles, be macho kind of thing.  It was more that than anything else.  And so I wore this big silver thing.  And I got so many letters, like people freaked out because I played this nice guy, on the show, this really sweet guy.  And then I did the Emmys and they saw, you know, the earring, it somehow freaked them out.  Um, so, I kinda, when it became too in, you know, when it became like so fashionable I stopped wearing it.  It's more fun when not everybody has a pierced ear.  So, I still have that hole over there.

Q:
Where else?

RDM:
Oh, yeah.  (laughter)  I don't have anything else pierced, actually, but I think, you know this thing with women getting their bellybuttons pierced?  I like that.   (laughter)  (Fever Observation:  Definite Tom Paris twang in his voice here. <g>)  Yes.  I'm not a big piercing person, but sometimes you'll see, you know, the right person with the right midriff and the right piercing.  I think that's a good thing, if you're going to pierce anything, I say that would be my first choice.  Not for me, but--  (laughter)  Anyway.  Enough about piercing.  I think we've covered it.  Yes sir.

Q:
"I'm not a sir," replies a Ferengi.

(Fever Observation:  The Ferengi was clothed.  How was RDM to know, despite the recent Ferengi feminist movement?)

RDM:
Oh, ma'am!  Sorry!

(laughter)

Q:
We've heard rumors that they were going to bring Voyager back home to Earth or are they going to keep wandering around in the Delta Quadrant?

RDM:
Yeah.  Um, you probably know as much as we do.  Yeah, bring us back.  I would--we were talking about this this week.  To sort of try and figure out what they might do.  I think what probably will happen is that, um, by the end of this season we might get back to Earth or maybe early next season.  Because Deep Space Nine, this is their last season coming up.  Right?  So, once they're off the air Paramount's not going to have Klingons around and Romulans and Cardassians, and all these cool things that we love so much.  So, we don't really have a lot of those in the Delta Quadrant.  So I think they'll want to get us back so we can deal with those characters, and, you know, explore those stories a little bit.  So, it's going to be interesting to see what happens.  I have mixed feelings about going back to the Alpha Quadrant.  Because I think there's been a lot of--it's been a great opportunity to be in the Delta Quadrant and just create a whole new world and new aliens and new stories and it's been a good opportunity that way, so I hate to see that go away, but yet, it definitely would be good to deal to bring in some of the other aliens, the other stories, some of the other background of Star Trek and sort of integrate all of that.  I don't know.  We'll see.  I think there's a good chance at the end of this season or next year sometime we'll get back.  Thank you, ma'am.  (laughter)  Lovely young lady over there (referring to Ferengi).  Yes, ma'am.

Q:
Tom and B'Elanna question--unintelligible.

RDM:
Is anything going to happen with Tom and B'Elanna anywhere, anytime, anything?  You know what, I think Brannon--I had a meeting with Brannon before we started this year to sort of talk about, you know, share feelings about things.  And I think it's a great relationship to explore.  It just needs to be explored within the context of a strong story.  And sometimes I felt like, earlier in that relationship sometimes they would explore it in sort of a melodramatic way.  And, so that was my feeling.  And Brannon agrees.  And I think that's going to change.  That if we deal with the relationship, its going to be to support a story.  And that the feelings and the things will come out of a need to do something in the story, rather than the ok let's cut to their quarters and let's have a, you know, heart-to-heart conversation.  I don't know, it got a little soapy for me, you know.  So, anyway, I think we're going to see--we're going to deal with it, for instance the next episode, the third episode we're going to shoot has a lot to do with B'Elanna and goes back to her dealing with her mixed feelings about herself.  Her race, her background.  It actually is a real dark episode.  She does some real self-destructive things in it, and I know the relationship's gonna be dealt with in that episode, but it's going to be more about what's going on for her rather than this kind of this, you know, sweet scenes.  So, yeah, we'll see things happen with it.  Definitely.  And I know Brannon said that they want to, he used the words they want to sex up the show this year.  (positive audience reaction)  So, I think Seven of Nine was not enough.  (laughter)  So, I'm getting implants.  (laughter)  I will be wearing a very tight suit.  I don't want to let everything out, but . . . Scary thought.  So Brannon said very, very plainly they really want to sex up the show.  They want to get us all out of the space suits.  You know, we've been in those space suits all the time.  For instance, they want to find us in situations where we might be in more casual clothes, or if we're on a planet that's really hot that we're able to take off the space suits and actually be more people . . . And show our implants.  I'm not referring to--I mean, my implants.  Um.  Anyway.  You can tell it's been a while since I've done one of these things.  Whatever you want to know I'll tell ya.  Yes.

Q:
I wanted to ask you this question because I asked Roxann in Springfield, and I know what her answer is.  Has B'Elanna broken any of Tom's bones yet?

(laughter)

RDM:
She's tried to break a bone.  (laughter)  (realizing what he just said)  Excuse me.

(more laughter as RDM digs in deeper)

(Fever Comment:  from frying pan to fire . . . )

RDM:
Let's talk about piercing, shall we?  (laughter)  She asks if B'Elanna has broken any of Tom's bones yet.  And ah, um, no.

Q:
That's not what she says.

RDM:
We've tested the limits.  Let's put it that way.

Q:
You may have to get your stories straight.  She says differently.

RDM:
She does, does she?

Q:
She says Tom heals very quickly.

RDM:
Okay, Roxann.  (laughter)  Yes, sir.

Q:
What kind of advice would you give an aspiring actor?

RDM:
What kind of advice?  Oh, wow.  Let me put it this way.  My daughter just did her first play last weekend.  She was in "Bye Bye Birdie."  Yeah, she played Kim MacAfee.  She's eight years old, in "Bye Bye Birdie."  I had such mixed feelings about it, with my daughter.  I was so excited to see her doing something that I could relate to and I remembered when I--I wasn't her age--but when I was younger, I was excited.  But I was like scared to death of her becoming an actress.  It is a very hard--I'm very lucky to be here and to have this job on Star Trek.  We are so lucky as actors.  And there's a lot of people that aren't as fortunate as us.  Most people, 99% of the people with SAG cards are, you know, don't make a living as an actor.  It's a very hard profession.  Boy, what advice would I give?  If there's anything--this was something a high school teacher of mine said to me--she said if there's anything else you can see yourself doing, go do that.  Because, the only way you should become an actor is if there is absolutely nothing else you can possibly ever do with your life.  And that's how strongly you feel about it, then give it a shot, you know.  Boy, what advice would I give?  After that's said, that being said, I don't know.  I think you just have to be yourself and do what you believe in, and always be honest.  Whether it's auditioning or acting or whatever.  In pursuing it, have courage, be honest.  And do honest work and work you believe in.  That's what I would say.  That's kind of heavy.  And get implants, too.  (laughter)  I am in so much trouble.  Okay.  Yes, sir.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
I am totally--you know I'm not being serious about this.  I'm just saying that I would get implants.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
How has Seven of Nine being in the cast changed the chemistry?

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Jeri Ryan?  Jeri's great.  She really is, and I'm just joking about the thing about the implants, you know.  She gets to wear a tight suit and I don't.  And I want that, too.  How has it changed the chemistry?  I'd have to say it's been hard in a lot of ways, to be honest.  That character is a great character.  And it brought a lot of interesting new possibilities to the show but it also got a lot of attention last year.  You know, that's the truth.  The writers gave it a lot of attention, and the studio, the network, and so it created some friction.  Well, some--The morale was a little lower than I remember it in the first few years.  But you know, if the stories are better and the show is better and the morale's not so good, then that's--The show is what's most important.  And I think that character brought a lot of good things to the show.  I think it was hard for us to see Jennifer go.  It kind of made everybody feel--we kind of felt like it was one kind of big buddy family and the reality that they could let someone go well--that someone could leave in any season was a little, uh, a little sobering, you know.  (Looking in direction of a group of Flighters/Feverites)  What are you guys laughing at?  (laughter)  (giving the laughing group a bad time)  I'm talking about heavy, heavy stuff.  They're giggling up here.

Q:
Do you really want to know?

RDM:
What?

Q:
(group throws it back in his court)  Do you really want to know?  Look at this section.

RDM:
(joking with group)  No.  No, I don't want to know.  If you can't share with everybody, then, no.

Q:
Oh, I'll tell him.

RDM:
No, no.  Yes.  Tell us.  Tell us.  We're dying to know now.

Q:
We were talking about Mr. Fluffy and how you got the name.

RDM:
Mr. Fluffy.

Q:
The real truth behind it.

RDM:
The real truth behind Mr. Fluffy.  (asking crowd)  Do you mind if I digress into Mr. Fluffy for a minute?  (laughter)  Because it's much more important than the morale and . . . Mr. Fluffy.  I don't have a nickname.  You know, I used to have nicknames on the show.  The first season was Mr. Fluffy.  The real--the truth behind Mr. Fluffy?  It's kind of boring though.  I'll tell you the truth.  Not the version--No--

(laughter)

Q:
That's not what we heard.

RDM:
Tell me the version you heard.  I was Mr. Fluffy the first season and the way it happened was--it's been a long time--and we were shooting the pilot and we were out in the dessert, it was really hot and everybody was really sweaty, and tired and I sat down in a chair near Kate Mulgrew, and she said, "Oh, it's Mr. Floppy," or something like that.  And the crew thought she said Mr. Fluffy, and they thought that was really funny.  So, before I knew it, everybody in the crew was calling me Mr. Fluffy.  That's how it happened, it was like . . . What is your version?  We'll talk about that in the room, along with piercing.  We've got a whole lot of stuff to go over.  Yes, sir.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
They tend to hire a lot of aliens on soap operas.  You know what, I don't know.  I think that soap operas, I think so many actors in the past 20-30 years may have spent time on daytime television just because there's a lot of work there, especially when you're starting out.  Uh, it's an easier place to get a first opportunity than in big movies or night time television.  So I think it's just the fact they have a lot of jobs in daytime television and people kind of go through it.  That's all I can think of.  I don't know.  I don't know.  Yeah.

Q:
You  were saying that you were talking to Brannon Braga earlier about--quoting some things about the next season and, I don't know, as an observation from my own part, some of the best episodes have always been the really ensemble ones, where one person, like Seven or whatever, hasn't been focused on exclusively and you get the whole crew.  Are they going to get more to that this year again?  Because it just seemed like an awful lot of attention to Seven.

RDM:
Did you guys hear that one back there?

Q:
No.

RDM:
Not really.  I'm sorry.  She sounds so loud up here.  (laughter)  Loud and annoying!

Q:
I've been told that many times.

RDM:
All right.  She said she feels like some of the best episodes were the ensemble shows where everybody was really integrated and involved in the story rather than a particular character having the whole show.  And are we going to have more of those shows this year.  I think we'll, boy, I don't know.  I think that they really do want to try.  You know, the truth is, last year with Seven of Nine they focused a lot on that character, and I think they realize it now that they need to go back and build up the integrity of the other characters.  Or maintain that integrity.  So I think there's going to be a real effort to go back and go back to have stories where everybody's role is better defined and stronger.  So I think there'll be an effort for that, but they don't know what they're doing.  If they get a good story then they write it whether it's the whole cast or just a couple of people.  Not that they don't know what they're doing, but they don't really have such a great--it's not like a math problem, you know.  They can't sort of plan it out and figure it all out.  It kind of evolves, depending on how one show works.  If they find that, Oh wow, there's this chemistry working between these two characters, you know, let's try to develop that.  Why don't we keep that going for a while.  It kind of evolves.  So, I know they're going to try to make these stories more ensemble and really fill out the stories with the whole cast a little bit more, but who knows, you know.  We get our scripts for--We started shooting Friday morning for the second episode, and I got the script Thursday night for that.  So, they don't know what they're doing.  (laughter)  They have no idea.  Yes, ma'am.

Q:
Have you ever thought of writing, and if so, what would you write about?  A script or something?

RDM:
Have I ever thought about writing for our show?  Or writing?  I have written a little bit.  I actually, I haven't written anything, like I know Roxann, for instance, wrote a play that was produced last year and did well with the university play competition.  I haven't really had anything produced that way, but I'm actually working on a pilot idea--a series pilot idea--with a partner.  For Nickelodeon, actually.  This whole Alan Strange/Alex Mack thing has gotten me in that world a little bit, so I'm working on a pilot for that.  Yeah, there's a handful of things that I have ideas about, you know, I'd love to develop.  I don't see myself being a writer writer, just doing that.  I think if I wrote, it would be more sort of combining the directing or maybe the acting.  Things like that.  I see it just being part of the whole creative process.  If I get inspired about an idea, I'd love to write what I can but I probably wouldn't just go do that alone.  So, I know that on our show, for instance, they don't want the actors to write.  Funny, they let them direct, but they don't want them to write.  So we can go in and we can give them, you know , story ideas, character ideas, things like that, but, you know, they'll listen, but it's not like we can get credit.  We can't say, well, here's an idea if you want to buy it.  I'll write a script.  They won't let us do that.  So, I've had some ideas but I haven't actually gone down and written them.  I've had meetings with them and said what if you do this or do that, but they write it.  Which is fine by me.  Yes, ma'am.

Q:
Is there a certain role or character that you would like to play . . . ?

RDM:
Any kind of role or character?  Boy, I don't know if there's any particular character. I'd like to play something, you know, contemporary, like in present day.  I'd like to do that soon, while Star Trek is going.  I'd like to--I'm anxious to do that.  I'd like to do something that's like, you know, contemporary world.  Real world.  There's a different quality to that than science fiction and fantasy.  Sometimes, when you're acting it even, you feel I don't know, it's a different kind of acting.  You know what I mean, sometimes you're doing like a Quentin Tarantino character. I'd love to do something like that.  I'd love to play something that's really kind of edgy and contemporary.  That's something I'd like to do.  Yes?

Q:
Why is your character claustrophobic?

RDM:
Why is he claustrophobic?

Q:
Did anything cause that?  I don't know.

RDM:
I have no idea.  I don't know.  You know, they'll do things sometimes that are opposites of the expected.  So I think one thing that I think that came out of having this cool pilot, you know, a tough guy, or pretends to be, comes off as a tough guy on the outside, but underneath it there's something surprising.  I think that's really where it came out of.  Also, whatever works for a laugh.  Sometimes they'll go with that.  Yes, ma'am.

Q:
Are we ever going to get an episode that focuses on Tom Paris again?

RDM:
Are we ever?  That's a good question.  Are we ever going to get an episode that focuses on Tom Paris?

Q:
And follows through with some of these things that they bring up, like the claustrophobia or his past?

RDM:
Right.  I have no idea.

Q:
If not, what can we do to help?

(laughter)

RDM:
I will be playing Captain Proton.  (laughter)  And, uh, yeah, I don't know.  You know, I think that sometimes, uh--I don't know.  I don't know what they have in mind.  We just got this script, like I said, the night before we start shooting, so I don't think they really have any specific ideas.  But I'm sure if the right story comes along there'll be one.  You know, for instance, that episode that we shot last year with the alien switching bodies.

Q:
"Vis a Vis."

RDM:
"Vis a Vis."  Right?  Did you guys see that one?

Q:
Yes.

RDM:
Um, I thought that was a great idea, but the execution, you know, I don't know how to explain what I mean, but it was a really great opportunity that didn't quite go all the way.  And I would love to see more opportunities like that.  I would love to see them sort of follow through and really go all the way.  That was one episode that, well, my suggestion for that episode was that I felt like when this alien--what I thought was the most interesting part of the story is have this alien switch bodies right away, and then let us see the character that looks like Tom Paris but is really an alien really cause trouble.  Like really explore that and make the stakes huge.  Rather than they sometimes they seemed very kind of petty.  The scenes were very small.  It was like getting worked up about little things.  I don't know.  You know, I said why didn't they take the captain hostage?  There could be all kinds of things that could happen.  Really wonderful moments with this alien that's possessing Tom Paris' body.  They could have done some wonderful things, but it didn't quite ever go that far.  It kind of stopped with the switch.  I didn't think that was so interesting.

Q:
Were you disappointed you didn't get to do your Janeway impression?

RDM:
Yes.  I was.  (laughter)  I was very disappointed.  Let me go way to the back.  Who's the farthest back?  Way back there.  Yes. ma'am.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
How would I see Tom Paris growing?  What would I see the opportunity being?  Um, I don't know specifically what it would be, but I think that I think that the one thing that Tom Paris brings that's a little different than the other characters is that he should, in my mind, he should always be the guy who's always questioning the rules.  Questioning authority.  He doesn't really have an obligation to the Maquis side or to the Star Fleet side, necessarily.  In theory, he should be the guy that's always questioning authority, in a way.  I think what would be great is for him to have an opportunity to really kind of stand up alone for something.  Some-some--

Q:
Cause?

RDM:
Story.  Cause, thank you.  Hello.  (laughter)  Stand up alone for some cause.  Stand up against maybe the entire crew for something he really believes in.  I think that's an obvious opportunity.  There are so many situations that could bring that out, but they've never really done that with the character.  And I think that really defines that character more than anything.  Having him stand up for a cause and not for gambling on the holodeck or something stupid.  But stand up for something he really believes in and say I don't care what the rules are, I don't care what anybody says, I believe in this so strongly, I'm going to do it my way.  And prove himself right.  I think that's something that nobody else, no other character, really does quite the same way.  So that's what I'd love to see, is a real--I think that's the kind of story that everybody could relate to, too.  You know, everybody's been in those moments when they've felt alone and want to stand up against authority.  That would be a good opportunity.  Yes, ma'am.

Q:
We've heard some really good stories about practical jokes that have been done . . .

RDM:
Have I had my chance to get a good practical joke?  To do something to someone.  Help me, fan club!  (laughter)  I'm so bad at this.  We do this all the time, and I forget.  We do it so many times.  I'll tell you one thing, yeah, yeah, the commbadge.  You know those dolls that are solid plastic and they come on a stand that looks like a communicator?  It looks like a big communicator that holds the doll up?  You know the ones I'm talking about?  I got one of these one time and I had this big scene with Janeway--this was a couple years ago--I had this big scene with Janeway where she came and she yelled at me about something.  So, I had the prop guys take the stand and put velcro on the back and sort of fill it in, so it became like a really big communicator.  (laughter)  And I could stick it on my uniform.  They just stick on with velcro, the real ones just come on and off with velcro.  So, I have this big one, and right before the take, Kate's outside and she's going to come into my quarters, or I forget where it was.  And uh, it's this big heavy scene, right?  So they call rolling, and I switch the communicator.  I have this really big communicator.  It's really big.  She comes in and she goes, "Mr. Paris, I need to talk to you."  And I  stood up and said, "Mine's bigger than yours and I'm taking over the ship!"  (laughter)  That was a good one.  That got a few laughs.  Oh, what else, what else?  I don't know, we do stuff all the time.  It's a lot of fun.  We have a good time.  Yes.

Q:
I was wondering, how odd was it with your wife being pregnant and Roxann, who plays your girlfriend, being at about the same stage of her pregnancy?

RDM:
Totally the same time.  She said how did it feel to have my wife was pregnant at exactly the same time as Roxann Dawson on the show, who plays my girlfriend.

Q:
Hormone overload.

(laughter)

RDM:
What?

Q:
Hormone overload.

RDM:
Hormone overload.  I think she breaks my bones, but--  (laughter)  Yeah, you know what? It was really  strange, because--It was just unbelievably strange.  Because exactly--I'd get home and my wife's like morning sick and ohhhh and the hormones are going crazy and I'd think, Oh God, just let me go to work.  (laughter)  And I'd get to work, and there'd be Roxann going (RDM mimicking a tearful Roxann) "I don't think I can do this."  Oh no.  Please!  It was exactly the same conversations.  Yeah, it was very weird.  Talking about amnios or something, and then I'd go to work and talk about amnios.  It was a strange year.  Let's see.  Yes, ma'am.

Q:
Is Dan Butler as funny in person as he is on Frasier?

RDM:
Oh.  Dan Butler.  I was thinking of Dan Curry.  When you said Dan Butler I was thinking Dan Curry and in my mind I'm going, Dan Curry's not really that funny.  (laughter)  He's our special effects supervisor.  Nah, he's pretty funny.  Dan Butler, yes.  Dan Butler's very funny.  He's very funny.  Actually, I had a great time working with Dan Butler.  On "Vis a Vis" he played the alien that flip-flopped.  Dan is an actor from New York, and I lived in New York for about 10 or 11 years, so we knew like all the same people, we worked at the same theaters, and so it felt like, you know, like a school reunion, or something when he came on the show.  'Cause we'd go, oh yeah, you know Julie, or you did the WPA.  It was fun.  It's fun when you feel like the community of actors, and you know the same people.  You keep running into the same people and have all these things in common.  What was the other question?  Who flubs the most lines?  Definitely, hands down, Robert Beltran.  (chuckles)  Sorry.  Sorry.  It's true.  He's a nice guy, he's cute, I know.  But--  (loud laughter)  But soooo simple.  (laughter)  No. He's not simple.  What does he say about me?  No.  He would admit it.  Totally.  He admits it, right?  He totally flubs the most lines.  And it's unbelievable, it's like you call his answering machine and it's, "Hi, this is Robert B--*#@!  What is my name?"  He can't remember his name.  (laughter)  Like if the Captain says, "Chakotay take the helm," or something, and his line is "Yes, ma'am."  Well, you can imagine.  "Yes, *#@!  Who wrote this?!"  He has the foulest mouth.  Unbelievable.  He's actually had memos sent to him by some of the production office saying please watch your language on the outtakes.  We have to sit through the dailies and all we hear is like locker room.  He's unbelievable.  What else?  What else was I going to say that was sort of funny?  I still don't remember.

Q:
When you said that Robert messed up the most lines, did you see his version of Hamlet, and was it filled with, uh, colorful adjectives?

RDM:
He said about Robert Beltran--he asked if I'd seen Robert in Hamlet, that he did last year--about a year ago.  And did he improvise with colorful adjectives in that production the way he does in our show?  You know what?  You know what's amazing about Robert?  He flubs lines sometimes when--it kind of goes back to what I was saying about directors who don't really push the actors--He flubs lines sometimes when he's not as focused about things.  It's just his way of working.  He can be wonderful in a very sort of improvisational kind of way.  Robert can do great work without studying and working really hard, but his Hamlet, for instance, he worked very hard on that, and he was wonderful in it.  And he was very focused, and I think that, you know, when we had--well, when I was directing "Unity", for instance.  I really talked to Robert a lot before we started shooting and, you know, while they were lighting the show, we would sit on the side and talk about the scenes and rehearse the scenes, and nobody ever does that.  None of the directors really do that, you know.  I don't know why.  But Robert never blew lines in "Unity."  He never, never--he knew his lines; he didn't go up; he never, you know, forget his lines.  And I think it was because he was more focused.  He was really, you know, when he feels like people are really interested and doing hard work then he'll remember his lines.  But his Hamlet was great, actually.   His Hamlet was very funny, believe it or not.  Which I think is, uh, when you think of Hamlet, you think oh this heavy drama.  There's a lot of that, obviously.  He also found a lot of humor throughout.  Robert brought a lot of his own charm to it and silliness to it, and it was great.  A really good show.  Ummm.  Yes, sir, right over there.

[audience comment unintelligible]

(laughter)

RDM:
The drive-in movie?  That was right after that.  They cut that scene out.  (laughter)  It's going to be in the European version.  The cable version of our show.  Yeah, you know what they actually--I thought you were being serious.  When we were sitting in the Camaro they actually did cut a part of that scene out.  Is that what you're talking about or were you just joking?

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
They actually did cut a part of that scene out because when we sat and we get in the car in that scene and she had some line about like are you going to treat me like your car or something?  And then there was this wonderful dialogue.  I thought it was really wonderful dialogue where I was saying things like, "Yeah I'm gonna buff your headlights."  (roaring laughter)  Really, I'm serious.  I don't remember exactly what it was.  Something like, "rev your engine into overdrive."  This very flirty kind of fun stuff.  And I'm not sure who didn't like it, but somebody thought it came off, I don't know what.  Somebody didn't like it, and so they cut it.  So it goes from us getting in the car to, you know, a kiss or something, which is fine, but it was so fun, in between, and it was a shame.  It was one of my favorite moments in the whole show.  I thought it really captured their relationship in a good way.  The playfulness and the flirtiness and the fun of it.  So, that will be in the European version.  We'll go to Europe and watch it over there.  Yes, ma'am.  Sir, yes, sir.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Did I ever audition for any other Star Trek roles before those two?  No, those are the only two--those are the only two times I ever auditioned for Star Trek.  So, I'm like batting a thousand; I just thought of that.  (laughter)  I do okay at Star Trek.  Yeah, those were the only two roles I ever auditioned for at Star Trek.  Yeah.  That would be a yes; I can't think of anything else to say to it.  Yes, sir.

[Slipstream technology question.]

RDM:
Boy, I don't know.  You'd think so, wouldn't you?  But a lot of times we've come up with these really cool things in an episode and then forget about them.  I should repeat this because you guys don't know what he said. He mentioned the slipstream technology that we picked up from some aliens in one episode.  He asked if we were going to use that to get back home or use it at all.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Yeah.  So far, no.  So far in the scripts this season-- the script this season--we haven't used it.  But, yeah, you know, that's a hard thing, because like, if we were always using all the technology along the way we would have been home by season three.  We've found some really cool things along the way, but I don't think we're going to use slipstream technology, not that I know of anyway.  Yes, sir.

Q:
How large is the shuttlebay, because you're constantly going through shuttlecraft?

RDM:
We have a biiiiggg shuttlebay!  (laughter)  Lots of vehicles in there.   Yeah, actually we have two types of shuttlecraft on our ship that we must keep rebuilding and rebuilding.  But actually, Brannon mentioned this and they refer to it in this next episode that we're doing, that how either one shuttlecraft is too big, or one is too small, and they say, well, Tom, why don't you work on developing some new shuttlecraft?  So we're going to build something new that is going to be a new type of shuttlecraft that I'm gonna supposedly develop and research and design this new cool shuttlecraft.  I'm not sure what it's going to do or how different it's going to be, but--

Q:
It's  going to be your Camaro.

RDM:
It's going to be a Camaro.  (laughter)  It's going to have a lot of chrome, like my Harley.  I think that would be cool, chrome on a shuttlecraft.  Yeah.  I wanted to have--you know the scene with the Camaro that we were talking about?  I really tried to talk them into using my Harley Davidson.  I have a real Harley at home, and--a Road King--Anybody ride a Harley in here?  (sparse applause)  Anyway, yeah, so I thought they wanted something retro and 20th century in the scene and something a guy would work on in his garage a lot.  So I said I have a Harley at home; I'll bring it in; you can use it for free.  That would have been cool, but they didn't go for it.  I bet that would have also been fun trivia, if it was my real motorcycle on the show, you know.  But, they didn't go for it.  Yes, sir.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Any episodes with Q?  We haven't seen Q in a while, have we?  Ohhh.  How many people want to see Q?

(applause)

Q:
B'Elanna versus the Lady Q.

RDM:
All right.  I think that would be great.  B'Elanna versus the Lady Q?

Q:
You're the prize.

RDM:
That would be pretty good, wouldn't it?  I would love to see Q.  I think he's--What?

Q:
Helmboy!

RDM:
Helmboy.  (laughter)  I think we saw Q a lot the first season or two, and then, I don't know why he hasn't come back.  I have no idea.  I don't know.  I would love to see him though.  I would love to see him come back on the show.  But I don't know anything in particular.  You know Brannon Braga took over as sort of as the head honcho of our show this year, and so I definitely think there's going to be a change in the tone of the show in a lot of ways.  I don't know.  What?

Q:
I said no kidding.

RDM:
Yeah, you've got Jeri Taylor and then you've got Brannon Braga.  They're a little different people.  Brannon's got a much--Jeri's sensibilities seem to be much more classically sort of orientated as far as her stories go.  Very traditional kind of classic stories, whereas Brannon tends to be much more twisted.  (laughter)  So, I have a feeling there's going to be much edgier kind of things happening this season, you know.  I don't know what that has to do with Q, but I thought I'd tell you that.  Yes.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Sorry, I couldn't hear that.  As they get closer to Earth . . . ?

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Oh, the rift between my father and me?  That relationship?  I don't really know if they're going to go into the backstory of that.  I don't know when or if they will.  I know Jeri Taylor has written a backstory and put it in a book.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Oh, right.  What's the book called?

Q:
Pathways.

RDM:
Pathways, right.  Thank you.  Yeah, she mentioned that she had written some backstory about, well, all the characters, I guess, in that book, right?  But I don't know if--yeah, except Seven of Nine.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Probably.  I don't know.  Is she in that book?

Q:
She gets her own novel in the fall.

RDM:
She gets her own book.  Jeri Taylor write it?

Q:
No.

RDM:
Somebody else?

Q:
Christie Golden.

RDM:
Ah, okay.  I'm glad I came today.  (laughter)  Can I ask you guys some questions?  How was your flight?

[general comments from audience]

RDM:
The bus, that's nice.  What should I do tonight in Cleveland?

[Audience makes a variety of offers, including getting something pierced.]

Q:
We've got plans for you.

(laughter)

RDM:
I don't have any plans, and I wanted to get a piercing of some kind.

(laughter)

Q:
We know where to take you!

RDM:
You know where to take me.  That's scary.  You're with my fan club, and you know where to take me.  All right!  I've got a cool fan club.  All right.  This man will pierce me up here.  (RDM indicating a large Klingon in the front row brandishing a knife)  Ok. I'm up for it.  Let's go.  It's a ritual; it's a Klingon ritual we're going to do after this piercing thing.  Um, over here.  Yes, sir.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
What do I think the most important thing about Star Trek is?  And how do I feel like I fit into that?  What do I think the most important thing is?  Wow.  I don't know.  I think, um, I think one of the most important things is--actually, I remember talking about at a convention I did where there was a Star Wars actor and there were these Star Trek actors, and I felt this real division between fans, like Star Wars fans generally didn't like Star Trek, but the Star Trek actors (Fever Observation:  suspect he meant "fans" here but I hesitate to put words in Robbie's mouth) kind of liked all the sci-fi stuff.  They kind of embraced the whole genre and all the different kinds and interpretations of it.  Anyway, my point of this is that I think the thing that the most important thing about Star Trek is that it really sort of, ub, ugh, blahh (RDM's tongue gets twisted in a blooper reel kinda way and RDM makes assorted choking sounds).  Sometimes, English is a second language.  It predicts, it sort of encourages this wonderful variety of people and a sort of--

Q:
Tolerance?

RDM:
Tolerance.  Thank you.  Hello!  That's why I brought my club, to help me with English.  Yeah, but Star Trek, I think--the most important thing about Star Trek is the analogy that the Star Wars people were like Star Wars is the only way.  They couldn't respect and include and try to understand all these other people, whereas Star Trek, I think the fans and the stories and the whole Star Trek world sort of embraces everything and everyone and says we can all sort of get along.  Not that we all have to be alike, not that we all have to agree, but we can all sort of figure out a way to live together.  Except for the Klingons, of course.  (laughter)  There's always going to be conflict, but yet I think there's a real hopeful quality.  There's something about Star Trek that has a hopefulness that I don't think exists in any other kind of--I'm flubbing a line here--there's like this hopefulness, that doesn't exist in the same way anywhere else.  It's a hopefulness which somehow touches people and that's the most important thing.  I don't know how to define it.

Q:
How do you feel being idolized by all the Star Trek fans, now that you're involved in it?

RDM:
It's weird.  She said how does it feel to be idolized by all the Star Trek fans.  It's kind of--it's funny in a way.  I fell into this by accident.  Really. I really did fall into this by accident.  I did the first Star Trek episode--

Q:
"The First Duty."

RDM:
"The First Duty," thank you.  They're very helpful.  I did get into this by accident, because I was waiting on another job--I've told this many times--I was waiting to start on another job that I was really anticipating a lot, and my agent said go do this Star Trek thing; it will get your mind off of it.  I said, I don't want to do Star Trek.  I don't want to do anything while I was waiting for this other big job.  He said no, just go do it; you'll have fun.  We hear it's a great company, you know, good actors.  You'll have fun, and you'll keep busy until you start this other thing.  And so it was totally by accident I fell into this whole world.  If it wasn't for that first episode, "The First Duty," I wouldn't have been on Voyager.  My character probably wouldn't have been created, not quite the same way if it wasn't for that episode.  So, how do I feel being idolized?  It's kind of weird.  I feel like it kind of happened by accident, and I am very, very thankful for it, like I said earlier.  We're very lucky, all of us, to have been invited into this wonderful world of Star Trek.  And you know, you guys are what make it go on and on and on.  You  guys really do it. I mean, I think UPN has learned that, Paramount obviously has obviously learned that.  That there's this wonderful family of people out there who want to support this hopeful kind of ideal.  And so, anyway, I feel very lucky to be a part of it.  And I'm getting implants, too.  (laughter)  Yes?

[Question about who, if anyone, RDM keeps in touch with from All My Children]

RDM:
Am I in contact with anybody working on All My Children?  There's one guy that I've always been good friends with and we, actually, sort of cross paths.  Steve Caffrey is his name.  He played Andrew Cortlandt.  Andrew Cortlandt?  Andrew Cortlandt, I think.  Yeah.  And then he was on Tour of Duty for a few years--a series.  Steve Caffrey and I stayed really close.  Carmen Thomas, who played Hillary, I think, on the show.  Carmen and I actually grew up together in Atlanta.  We did like community theater together, so we still stay in touch.  And who else?  Who else?  I see Michael Knight every once in a while when I go to New York.  I see him and, you know, we'll hook up.  Who else?  That's about it.  I did stay in touch with Lauren, for a while.  Lauren Holly, who was on the show, she played my girlfriend.  Now she's married to Jim Carey, whatever they are.  She's very, very busy.  Yeah, I haven't seen Lauren in a couple of years.  I saw her--the last time I saw her was maybe, uh, two years ago.  They're trying to get me to shut up, but I'm not going to stop!  (Con organizers indicating to RDM that his time is up.)  I'm not going to stop!  (laughter)  Yes?  Yes.

Q:
We've seen . . . When do we get Tom with his shirt off?

(laughter)

RDM:
Tom with his shirt off?

[Resounding YES from the audience]

Q:
Why not now?

(laughter)

RDM:
Uh, No.  I don't know.  Have we seen the others with their shirts off?  We've seen Tuvok, we've seen Kate Mulgrew.  (laughter)  She had her shirt off in my episode "Sacred Ground."  I made her take her shirt off.  We even had to put up with Neelix with his shirt off.  I'm kidding.   I love John.  I don't know.  They never write it.

Q:
We keep writing letters.

Q:
From your fan club: A down payment for your shirt off. (waves folded up dollar bill in the air)

(laughter)

RDM:
Ohhh man. I have a feeling it will happen this year.  Oh my god!  (RDM noting the money being offered by someone in the audience has increased from $1.00 to several dollars)

(laughter)

Q:
We have a twenty back here, too.

RDM:
We can do a fund-raiser . . . Hey!  (to the Con organizers) You're making me get off, aren't you?  I have a feeling that everybody's shirt will come off this year.  (laughter)  I think it will.  It's kind of scary.  (getting the gist of the audience collective thought)  Not at once!

(laughter)

Q:
You mean there's hope for Harry?

RDM:
There's hope for (laughs) Harry, yes.  (laughter)  I think this is the year.  They're going to sex it up, and it's all coming off . . . I have more people telling me good-bye.  Yes, sir.

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Anything planned in the future Trekwise?  Boy, I don't know.  I don't know. No.  I don't think so.  Star Trek what?

[audience comment unintelligible]

RDM:
Star Trek the nudist camp.  Yeah.  You know, actually, I won't name names, but there was a makeup artist--there was a makeup artist--I don't know if I should tell you.  (audience encourages RDM)  There's a makeup artist who doesn't work on our show all the time--someone I met--who had this great idea to do like a really high production sci-fi kind of, uh, nude movie.  Like nude aliens.  Has that ever been done, do you know?

[audience comment unintelligible]

(laughter)

RDM:
That's what he really wanted to do.  He said, you know, we never see, like, nude, like alien sci-fi sex kind of, you know, thing.  I won't get into it; it was pretty graphic.  But they were going to do this whole production.  Maybe I can audition for that?  (laughter)  All right, I'm really going to stop.  Uh, I guess I have to stop.  So, come back tomorrow and we'll chat more.  Thank you very much!

(applause)